The Ethics of Writing Creative Nonfiction

Find Your Creative Muse

By Dave Hood

What are the ethics of creative nonfiction? The intent of the writer must be to write honestly and truthfully. The writer must not change facts, distort facts, fabricate facts, tell lies, or mislead the reader. Changing a story by adding significant, false details or events that never happened is writing fiction, not creative nonfiction. And if readers discovers that they have been deceived, the writer will lose credibility and a reading audience. And so, when writing creative nonfiction, such as a personal essay, memoir, or literary journalistic essay, the writer must strive to tell the truth the best he/she can. As well, the writer must not fabricate events or experiences.

In this article, I’ll discuss the ethics of writing creative nonfiction. The following will be covered:

  • Facts and Emotional Truth
  • Memory and Imagination
  • What gets included and omitted
  • Dealing with Exaggeration
  • Compressing Time
  • Composite Characters
  • Cues and Disclaimers

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Impact of 13 Female Artists

13 Trailblazing Female Artists

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“These are the female artists, designers, architects, and inventors who have impacted others with their tremendous, creative talents. Continue reading to view their stunning work and how they contribute to our world.”

These are the female artists, designers, architects, and inventors who have impacted others with their tremendous, creative talents. Continue reading to view their stunning work and how they contribute to our world.

The Library of Babel

“Just when you think you know what a novel is, Rebecca L. Walkowitz comes along and screws it all up.

In Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature, Walkowitz argues that it is becoming impossible to say what the original version of a novel is.”

Sounds like an interesting read, even if my interest may be perked by my new status as an English Graduate Student…

Click the link to read more!

Source: The Library of Babel

Humming the Star Wars theme to encourage myself, I wobbled onto my feet. Sometimes a girl’s gotta provide her own trumpet-heavy heroic soundtrack.
—  Shannon Hale, Dangerous